Crazy Quilters Guild
               
 
 
|   Home  |  Board |   Calendar  |   Educational Tidbits  |   Newletters  |   Programs  | |  Slide Shows |   Members  |   Sign In  |
|  Home |  Board |  Calendar | Ed Tidbits|  Newletters |   Programs  | |  Slides  |  Members |   Attendance  |   Sign In  |



October 2021
SOME SOLUTIONS TO DEAL WITH
THE PROBLEM OF FRAYING FABRIC

September 2021
MAKE FOUR FLYING GEESE UNITS AT ONE TIME

 

July - August 2021
WHAT TO DO WHEN CORNER POINTS
DON’T WANT TO MATCH UP

 
May - June 2021
THREE WAYS TO SEW BINDING: ONE AND DONE
 
April 2021
THIS, THAT, AND THE OTHER
 
March 2021
Make Something Fun and Simple as a Distraction
While Sewing a Complicated Quilt

 
February 2021
Changing a Quilt Pattern to Work For You

 
January 2021
January Musings
 

December 2020
Mitered Borders
 

November 2020
Edge Turn Machine Applique’
Using Light Weight Pellon

 

October 2020
Binding
 

September 2020
Using Up 2½-inch Squares,
Employing Batting Scraps to Layout Blocks,
and
Sewing Half Square Triangles

 
August 2020
Preparing Fabric Prior to Cutting,
Invisibly Piecing Quilt Backing,
and
Introducing Acorn Piecing Glue

 
July 2020
Squaring Up Blocks and a Mobile Design Wall
 
June 2020
The Quick Ripper, A Take-Apart Cutting Ruler,
and Other Ramblings

 
May 2020
Make a Memory of Hope “Crumb” Quilt

 
April 2020
Gadgets and Gizmos

 
March 2020
The Five-Star Method for Testing the ¼ Inch Seam

 
January 2020
Dealing With Overstuffed Magazine Storage

 
December 2019
Review Your Subscription Expiration Dates
 
November 2019
What to Do with Fabric Leftovers after the Bonanza?
 
October 2019
Cutting Tools and Cutting Aids
 
June 2019
Chain Piecing a 9-Patch Block
 
May 2019
Washing Fabrics and Quilts

 
April 2019
How To Make a Block Press
 
March 2019
Tips on Consistently Sewing
an Accurate Quilt Block

February 2019
A Quick Way to Un-Sew Seams,
Using a Seam Ripper,
Without Cutting the Fabric

January 2019
Repurpose Your 2018 Paper Calendar
for Your Next Quilt Project






October 2021
SOME SOLUTIONS TO DEAL WITH
THE PROBLEM OF FRAYING FABRIC

As of September 22nd, autumn is here, happy October! Traditionally, autumn brings the celebration of the bountiful harvest, colorful leaves on deciduous trees, and cooler weather. In California we don’t get those obvious signs of the change from summer to autumn. Here autumn means it’s pumpkin time. We can finally purchase all things pumpkin, including: farm grown pumpkins, pumpkin bread, pumpkin pancakes, and pumpkin spiced latte. However, I celebrate the beautiful seasonal orange squash, that is pumpkin, by eating Costco pumpkin pie, yum!

This month’s tidbit deals with fraying fabric. It is so disappointing when cutting into a quality piece of fabric, and it becomes like an uncoiled spring with threads splaying in all directions. When fraying has happened in the past, the best I could do was trim those threads off or use pinking shears. Now I use a pre-emptive method by cutting a small piece of the fabric to check for fraying before cutting out the entire pattern. If the fabric frays over much, I use a “La Camilla” rotary cutter to cut out the pieces for my quilt. The La Camilla features a blade that cuts fabric in a scallop pattern which defers fraying.
 


Pinking shears are still available when necessary.
 

Best Press used to crisp up the fabric before cutting can hold fraying at bay to some extent.

There are some liquid products you can apply to your fabric to defer fraying, but I have avoided those. Most say something like “use in a well ventilated area”. That does not appeal to me at all. I do not want to inhale some unknown chemical simply to stop my fabric from fraying.

To illustrate the La Camilla scallop cut and pinking shears combo, I will show you two quilt tops made from the same red and white fabric line. The first from a kit, the second from a jelly roll.

The following picture shows the “Ruby Red” kit quilt top in the fabric line “So Ruby”.  When I pulled the kit out of the cupboard, I was looking forward to making the quilt top and thought the kit instructions would tell me all I needed to know. Boy, was I surprised! The kit instructions told me how to cut out the fabric, but when it came to sewing, it simply said to sew the pieces together as shown in the picture. After several trial and error sewing steps, the quilt top finally looks like the kit picture. This trial and error process did little to ease the fraying problems I encountered. Each time I would handle the fabric or use the seam ripper, more fraying occurred.
 

As nice as this quilt top looks, you would never know that lurking underneath on the reverse side, behind the beautiful quilt top façade, lies fraying fabric! Threads are popping out all along the sashing.
 

When I pulled out the Ruby Red kit from the cupboard, I discovered I had also purchased a jelly roll and some fabric for borders, in the same “So Ruby” fabric line, to make a Card Trick quilt. Other than cutting the jelly roll and the borders, I had not cut out the background fabric for this second red and white quilt. I decided to use my anti-fraying techniques to sew the second quilt top and then compare the results of this quilt top to the “Ruby Red” quilt top.

Here is a picture of the finished “Card Trick” quilt top before final pressing:
 


When you turn it over you get this nice clean reverse side. There is a small amount of fraying on pieces I had previously cut with the regular rotary blade. All in all, the La Camilla with the scallop cutting blade and the pinking shears really do the trick to defer fraying. I used the scallop blade to cut out all the white pieces, and to square up the blocks. Next, I used pinking shears when trimming edges and making half square triangles.
 

Hope to be back with a tidbit in November. Please contact me at my email address listed in the members roster if you have any comments on this tidbit or if you have any ideas for future tidbits. I will research and report on topics you want to see discussed in a future tidbit. Have a happy October! Now, I must go to eat that Costco pumpkin pie.





multi color stripe
Please e-mail the Webmaster for any problems with the website or any questions: webmaster@crazyquiltersguild.org
 


October 2021
SOME SOLUTIONS TO DEAL WITH
THE PROBLEM OF FRAYING FABRIC

As of September 22nd, autumn is here, happy October! Traditionally, autumn brings the celebration of the bountiful harvest, colorful leaves on deciduous trees, and cooler weather. In California we don’t get those obvious signs of the change from summer to autumn. Here autumn means it’s pumpkin time. We can finally purchase all things pumpkin, including: farm grown pumpkins, pumpkin bread, pumpkin pancakes, and pumpkin spiced latte. However, I celebrate the beautiful seasonal orange squash, that is pumpkin, by eating Costco pumpkin pie, yum!

This month’s tidbit deals with fraying fabric. It is so disappointing when cutting into a quality piece of fabric, and it becomes like an uncoiled spring with threads splaying in all directions. When fraying has happened in the past, the best I could do was trim those threads off or use pinking shears. Now I use a pre-emptive method by cutting a small piece of the fabric to check for fraying before cutting out the entire pattern. If the fabric frays over much, I use a “La Camilla” rotary cutter to cut out the pieces for my quilt. The La Camilla features a blade that cuts fabric in a scallop pattern which defers fraying.
 


Pinking shears are still available when necessary.
 

Best Press used to crisp up the fabric before cutting can hold fraying at bay to some extent.

There are some liquid products you can apply to your fabric to defer fraying, but I have avoided those. Most say something like “use in a well ventilated area”. That does not appeal to me at all. I do not want to inhale some unknown chemical simply to stop my fabric from fraying.

To illustrate the La Camilla scallop cut and pinking shears combo, I will show you two quilt tops made from the same red and white fabric line. The first from a kit, the second from a jelly roll.

The following picture shows the “Ruby Red” kit quilt top in the fabric line “So Ruby”.  When I pulled the kit out of the cupboard, I was looking forward to making the quilt top and thought the kit instructions would tell me all I needed to know. Boy, was I surprised! The kit instructions told me how to cut out the fabric, but when it came to sewing, it simply said to sew the pieces together as shown in the picture. After several trial and error sewing steps, the quilt top finally looks like the kit picture. This trial and error process did little to ease the fraying problems I encountered. Each time I would handle the fabric or use the seam ripper, more fraying occurred.
 

As nice as this quilt top looks, you would never know that lurking underneath on the reverse side, behind the beautiful quilt top façade, lies fraying fabric! Threads are popping out all along the sashing.
 

When I pulled out the Ruby Red kit from the cupboard, I discovered I had also purchased a jelly roll and some fabric for borders, in the same “So Ruby” fabric line, to make a Card Trick quilt. Other than cutting the jelly roll and the borders, I had not cut out the background fabric for this second red and white quilt. I decided to use my anti-fraying techniques to sew the second quilt top and then compare the results of this quilt top to the “Ruby Red” quilt top.

Here is a picture of the finished “Card Trick” quilt top before final pressing:
 


When you turn it over you get this nice clean reverse side. There is a small amount of fraying on pieces I had previously cut with the regular rotary blade. All in all, the La Camilla with the scallop cutting blade and the pinking shears really do the trick to defer fraying. I used the scallop blade to cut out all the white pieces, and to square up the blocks. Next, I used pinking shears when trimming edges and making half square triangles.
 

Hope to be back with a tidbit in November. Please contact me at my email address listed in the members roster if you have any comments on this tidbit or if you have any ideas for future tidbits. I will research and report on topics you want to see discussed in a future tidbit. Have a happy October! Now, I must go to eat that Costco pumpkin pie.